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Legal alerts / 2 Jan 2017

Legal Alert – Remember You Can Now Use Longer Trial Periods in Your Employment Contracts

We would like to remind you that legislative changes allowing the employer to use a longer trial period entered into force on 1 January 2017.

This means that the maximum length of the trial period has now been increased from four months to six months. The changes concern employment agreements which have been concluded and signed from 1 January 2017 onwards.

New prolonged trial period in the future

Under the new rules, the employer is entitled to extend the trial period if the employee has been absent from work during the trial period due to family leave or disability. The employer should notify the employee of the extension before the original trial period expires.

The employer may extend the trial period with one month per every 30 calendar days’ period of absence due to disability or family leave. When calculating the duration of an absence, all days, including days off, are taken into account. For example, one calendar week of absence due to family leave or disability consumes seven days of the 30-day quota, even if the employee normally only works five days per week.

Fixed-term employments

It is good to keep in mind that in case of a fixed-term employment, the maximum length of the trial period together with its possible extensions is half of the duration of the employment and never more than six months.

Other changes to the Finnish Employment Contracts Act

In addition to the changes mentioned above, the parliament also approved other adjustments to the Finnish Employment Contracts Act which took effect on 1 January 2017. These changes shorten employers’ re-employment obligation after making employees redundant and enable hiring long-term unemployed for a fixed term without any other justified reason. Please find more information related to these changes from our previous legal alert.

Our experts will be happy to provide further information on any of the recent employment law changes.

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